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Iago 6

Page history last edited by RobbyMyers 8 years, 7 months ago

 http://www.google.com/imgres?q=Iago&um=1&hl=en&sa=N&rls=com.microsoft:en-us:IE-SearchBox&biw=1280&bih=872&tbm=isch&tbnid=2BDRVj13urePhM:&imgrefurl=http://disney.wikia.com/wiki/Iago&docid=e99bnADOff9ccM&imgurl=http://images.wikia.com/disney/images/b/b2/Iago_KHREC.png&w=930&h=900&ei=Z4YMT5r6HoS2qgGu6LTTBQ&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=1005&vpy=340&dur=546&hovh=221&hovw=228&tx=156&ty=119&sig=107995757622446340591&page=1&tbnh=145&tbnw=150&start=0&ndsp=24&ved=1t:429,r:11,s:0

 

Act 1:Iago 

          Iago is the evil implicative character in the book. He is a Sergeant in the Venetian army and works under Othello the General, and Cassio the Lieutenant. He also married to Emilia, He’s also everyone’s best friend.  In Act 1.1 It begins with Iago and Roderigo going to meet with Barbantio. During this meeting Roderigo is the one talking to Barbantio. Roderigo is to telling him that Desdemona has ran off with Othello after she was meant to be in bed. Igao jumps into the conversation and tells Barbantio “I am one, sir that comes to tell you your daughter and the Moor are now making the beast with two backs” (1.1.129-130). In other words what Iago is saying is that Othello and Desdemona are having sex.Act 1.2 Iago runs off and informs Othello that Barbantio, Roderigo, and some soilders are on there way to arest him. Then in Act 1.3 Iago is having a secret meeting with Roderigo about that he shouldn't kill himself and insted work for him by selling his lands and homes so he would have money for when desdemona get's sick of Othello.

 

Act 2: Iago

 

            Iago is still an evil character as the story progresses in Act 2. After he used Rodrigo to sell all his land and gain his money he started to begin his real plan. He wanted nothing more than to see Othello in absolute despair. But to not have his evil personality leak out he covers it with a kind attitude towards others. The other victim to Iago’s plot became Cassio. While Cassio is on guard duty Iago invites him to a drink. Of course this is all part of his diabolical plan to destroy Cassio’s future. While Iago and Cassio are drinking, Cassio becomes terribly drunk. It was a level of drunk that Iago was enough to get Cassio to fight Roderigo. This in the end of the fight got him in trouble with the Othello and then was demoted. “Now, ‘mongst this flock of drunkards am I to put our Cassio in some action that may offend the isle” (2.3.61-64).The personality of Iago changes every now and then when he’s with another person. He does this to show Othello that he’s loyal and trustworthy but in reality that is a mere lie.

 

Act 3: Iago

 

            Iago doesn’t stop with his evil plot to destroy Othello as he drags Cassio deeper into the hole of despair. After convincing him to speak to Desdemona about Cassio being demoted he quickly goes to Othello to tell him that Cassio is flirting with Desdemona. Once Othello enters the scene, Cassio quickly runs away as Desdemona explains to Othello to have him give back Cassio’s position. Othello tells her that his head hurts and she offers him to wrap his head with the handkerchief he gave her. Without realizing it as they walked away, the handkerchief was dropped onto the street where Emila, Iago’s wife, found it and gave it to Iago. Everything changed when the handkerchief was given to Iago. Once Othello returns back to Iago, Iago told him that Desdemona was cheating on him and presented the handkerchief. In a blind rage Othello swore to kill Desdemona as Iago, as evil as he was, vowed to kill Cassio. Once this is said and done Othello promotes Iago to the rank of lieutenant.

 

Act 4: Iago

     Act 4.1. Starts with Iago talking about Desdemona giving the handkerchief away to any man. “why then,’tis hers, my lord, and being hers, she may, I think, bestow’t on any man” (4.1.15-16).

Then Iago starts convensing Othello that he has seen Cassio have the handkerchief in his postion. Iago also tells Othello that Cassio isn’t to shy about talking about it to him and will answer same questions about it. In Act 4.2. Iago is talking with Desdemona about why she is upset. He then fools Desdemona into meeting with Cassio. So after Desdemona leaves Iago meets with Roderigo, he is telling Iago that his words are pioson. “faith I have heard too much, and yours words and performances are no kin together” (4.2.213-214).

 

Comments (3)

Kristina Pak said

at 10:06 am on Jan 11, 2012

The fonts are different.
I like how you have quotes to support your statements.
I thinks you should summarize it in one thing instead of breaking it down by acts.
Citation on the picture is wrong. But overall it delivers the information

Cordel Nedd said

at 4:42 pm on Jan 11, 2012

" Iago is the evil implicative character in the book." it was a play not a book.
There are some spelling/grammar problems. You shouldnt be spelling the character's name wrong. I like the idea of breaking down the story from the begining to show how Iago has changed because I also did that. One thing you didnt do was tell what happens to Iago's character at the end of the play.

Cordel Nedd said

at 4:42 pm on Jan 11, 2012

picture ???

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